Dracula

By: Bram Stoker
Fiction
1897
Rating: 3.5/5

Dracula

We have all heard of Dracula.

The vampire who “vants to suck your blood.” The scary man who comes in the night dressed in all black with razor sharp fangs who can transform into a bat at will and sleeps in a coffin. Tell me this isn’t what you think of. 

As it turns out, not so far off.

Bram Stoker‘s Dracula is the reason we have today’s Twilight and The Vampire Diaries and any number of other vampire related entertainment (including this absolutely adorable movie I had the pleasure of watching recently). It was surely not the first book written about vampires, but it is most certainly the most impactful.

This story wasn’t exactly what I was expecting, but it wasn’t so far off either. I wonder what it would’ve been like to read when it first came out, without the cultural association of the word Dracula to the word vampire.

It’s an epistolary novel, written as a series of diary entries, newspaper clippings, and letters. It surrounds six friends brought together in a mysterious quest to rail against a strange disease that causes its victims to slowly lose their blood over a series of days or weeks. Hint, hint: it’s a vampire!

I don’t want to shed too much more light upon the plot line of Dracula, because so much of it has already seeped into our cultural knowledge.

Let me just say this: you’ll enjoy it.

It’s a bit longwinded at times and I did find myself getting a wee bit impatient here and there, but the overall story is hard to beat. Science fiction slash fantasy slash mythological superstition at its best.

A classic that isn’t quite as difficult as most classics.

 

*****

 

If you enjoyed Dracula, here’s some more suggestions:

(for old-school SciFi)

The Private Memoirs and Confessions of a Justified Sinner by James Hogg

Frankenstein by Mary Shelley

The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde

The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde by Robert Louis Stevenson

The Turn of the Screw by Henry James

The Haunting of Hill House by Shirley Jackson

The Island of Dr. Moreau by H. G. Wells

The Fall of the House of Usher by Edgar Allan Poe

(for more about vampires)

Twilight by Stephenie Meyer

Interview with the Vampire by Anne Rice

Fledgling by Octavia Butler

Carmilla by J. Sheridan LeFanu

(for more by Stoker)

Lady Athlyne by Bram Stoker

The Lair of the White Worm by Bram Stoker

The Snake’s Pass by Bram Stoker

The Primrose Path by Bram Stoker

 

Coming up:

Free to Choose by Milton and Rose Friedman

Go Set a Watchman by Harper Lee

Pigs in Heaven by Barbara Kingsolver

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One thought on “Dracula

  1. I read a good portion of this book cooped up in a tent at night with some major thunderstorms going on. Definitely added to the experience of reading the story

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